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Beaumaris Tree Preservation Society
 
PRESIDENT’S REPORT TO THE 1971 ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING
 
1.  OFFICERS:    PRESIDENT                . .    Mr. W. (William) Ridland 
                            VICE-PRESIDENT      . .    Mrs. N. (Bea) HOSKING 
                            HON. SECRETARY     . .    Mrs. M. (Gabrielle) Johnstone 
                            HON. TREASURER    . .    Mr. A. (Alfred) GILFORD 

                            COMMITTEE:                  Mrs. C. (Sue) McDougall,        Mrs. J. Palmer,                               Mr. K. (Kenneth) Rendell 
                                                                       Mrs. W. (Sheila) Ridland,        Mrs. P. Russell,                              Cr. G. (Geoffrey) Goode 
                                                                       Mr. J. (John) Iggulden,             Mr. M. (Michael) Johnstone,         Mr. W. (William) Leech 

                            Six committee meetings were held during the year.

 
2. CONSERVATION COUNCIL OF VICTORIA (DELEGATE – G. (Geoffrey) GOODE) 
            This body, with 70 societies now affiliated to it, has worked out and approved a constitution and is now engaged in building up efficient working procedures to handle major conservation problems and in providing a forum for discussion of matters raised by individual societies. It has assemled information for the Melbourne and Metropolitan Board of Works on a catalogue of conservation areas in M.M.B.W. district and is at present working on a similar study of Western Port for the Western Port Regional Planning Authority.
 
3. PORT PHILLIP CONSERVATION COUNCIL: (DELEGATES – M. (Michael) JOHNSTONE, W. (William) RIDLAND) 
            This body continues as the active centre of conservation interests around the Bay. With 15 conservation bodies as active members it has extended its activities to the western shore of Port Phillip and round into Western Port. Since its formation less than two years ago it has handled forty-five main issues. The quarterly Newsletter, which can be ordered through our Society, provides a summary of conservation activities around the Bay. 

            Western Port has become the major conservation issue in the State and the P.P.C.C. has joined with other interested groups to form the SAVE WESTERN PORT COALITION. Conservationists everywhere are asked to give active support and encouragement to the coalition’s campaign to halt further destructive development in the Western Port area.

 
4.    THE BEAUMARIS AREA
 
A.    GRAMATAN AVENUE HEATHLAND SANCTUARY. 
        This fenced reserve was designed to preserve a small portion of the heathland flora that once covered most of the Beaumaris area. It is under the control of our Society, the land being leased from Sandringham Council. 

        Working bees have been held during the year to reduce the excessive growth of tea tree, control weed infestation and repair damage by intruders. Control of such a reserve requires careful planning and skilled assistance and advice is being sought on a plan of treatment for the reserve.

 
B.  BEAUMARIS HIGH SCHOOL GROUNDS. 
        The southern section of the grounds, which retains a notable concentration of local flora, could become an area of widespread interest among botanists and botany students if it can be retained in its present state. We have approached the headmaster of the school and expressed our keen interest in this area and our wish to assist the school, in any way possible, in its preservation. 

        It should be noted that a small reserve, fenced by the Native Plants Protection Society, exists just inside the southern boundary. 

        The erection of a very large State Electricity Commission substation on the south-east corner of the grounds seems quite unwarranted in a purely residential area and the building is much too tall to allow it to be masked by trees.

 
C.  BANKSIA RESERVE.
        In spite of its name this reserve has no Banksias and few trees. It is unfortunate that the first major planting of trees in the reserve consists of a substantial group of Pinus radiata, quite regardless of the fact that the specific character of the Beaumaris area depends entirely on the profusion of native trees and shrubs.

        A request has been sent to Council to allow our Society to plant an equal number of native trees in the area already planted.

        A tree-planting plan has been prepared for the grounds of the Beaumaris Tennis Club at the request of the Tennis Club Committee.

 
D.  DONALD MacDONALD OVAL.
        The substantial stands of tea tree around the perimeter continue to suffer damage from vandalism and heavy ground cover, mainly weeds, prevents growth of tea tree seedlings. Council has undertaken planting of eucalypts and she-oak along the southern boundary but additional planting of tea tree seems not intended. Some Coprosma (New Zealand mirror-bush) was included in the planting but, at our request, Council has agreed that there should be no further planting of this exotic in this reserve.
 
E.  BALCOMBE PARK. 
        It is important that this park retains its natural aspect and splendid tea tree cover. There have been some recent proposals for clearing and building to allow for extensive sporting facilities but our Society is strongly opposed to any detrimental development.
 
F.  SMALLER RESERVES.
        Council is to be congratulated on its extensive planting of native trees and shrubs at the Beaumaris Concourse and on the reserve at the corner of Oak Street and Tramway Parade.
 
G.  STREET MAKING.
        It is unfortunate that Council felt impelled to construct the street on the south side of Banksia Reserve. The cost to the Council was substantial, the road is little used and the surroundings of the park are not improved. The only bright spot in the programme was the Council decision to spare the large red gum, which still stands in the roadway.

H.  BEACH PARK.
        Sandringham Council, as the Committee of Management, is responsible to the Lands Department for supervision of the area. While it is in many ways our most important conservation area it is subject to extreme public pressures, to encroachment by private enterprise and to extensive damage and deterioration.

        During this year there appears to have been private proposals aimed at establishment of some type of marina in the area of Keefer’s and a suggestion that a scout hall be allowed in the boat-shed area near Table Rock. Neither of these proposals has been raised in any official way but the Society should continue to be on guard against these and any other adverse developments.

        At Ricketts Point an inspection has been completed of the fully grown Banksias and proposals are being developed to improve this plantation. With Council approval our Society planted additional Banksias to replace older trees in the future. On the landward side of Beach Road, Council has completed and extensive planting program which is heartily welcomed.

        A log barrier suggested for the sea-front area by our Committee has been placed on the Council Estimates for the coming year. This should do much to prevent vehicles trespassing on the sea-front and the neighbouring beach.


W. RIDLAND    
President,     
9/11/1971
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